PRAL Timeline: Early Adoption Of New Standard

PRAL Standard Measure for Alkaline Diet

Early Adoption Of PRAL Standard is second in my series, Potential Renal Acid Load Timeline. So if you missed it, read PRAL Timeline: Proof Of Concept Years first. Then see below, how Remer and Manz’s new idea becomes validated and adopted around the world.

In future timelines, I will show how PRAL is adopted more as a world standard for measuring Alkaline Diets. Then you will see how useful PRAL is for many diseases. Because it can be used as an assessment tool during diagnosis. Also, PRAL can help measure treatment progress where diet is strongly linked to a disease.

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PRAL Timeline: Proof Of Concept Years

Proof of Concept

Proof Of Concept Years is first in my series, Potential Renal Acid Load Timeline. So this timeline follows published food research showing how Remer and Manz developed PRAL.

In future PRAL timelines, you will see how PRAL has become the world standard for measuring Alkaline Diets. Then you will see how useful PRAL is for many diseases. Because it can be used as an assessment tool during diagnosis. Also, PRAL can help measure treatment progress where diet is strongly linked to a disease.

Read morePRAL Timeline: Proof Of Concept Years

Redefining pH Balance Diet Scores

Easy pH Balance Diet Scales image

I started my pH balance diet scoring system with Potential Renal Acid Load (PRAL). This is a relatively simple way to estimate how healthy your diet is.

Let me explain why PRAL, and simpler alternatives, are important to planning a healthy pH balance diet. Along the way, I will also warn you of the dangers of older methods. We have known about weaknesses of these older methods for over 30 years. Yet, they are still used to promote expensive drinks, supplements, books and diet plans.

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PRAL (Potential Renal Acid Load) Nutrients Defined

PRAL Nutrients icon

PRAL Nutrients are those substances in food and drink that are used in the Potential Renal Acid Load (PRAL) calculation.

The PRAL score is the best indicator of how we can improve an alkaline diet. Though PRAL scores are calculated as absolute numbers, in practice, they should only be used as a general guide. Seasonal variations, different varieties, and cooking methods will all affect the PRAL score. Despite this variation, the numbers are useful in making better food choices. Ultimately, the proof of your alkaline diet comes when you test the pH of urine. The alkaline food lists will help point you in the direction of foods with lower PRAL scores if you need to raise the pH of your urine. There is more information on PRAL pH Balance Calculation.

The key to alkaline diets is that 20-30% of foods should be acidic, with the rest being alkaline or neutral. Overall, your total pH balance diet score should be alkaline. There is no target for PRAL. The target pH of urine in healthy individuals is 6.5 to 7 in the morning, rising to 7.5 through the day. The target should be higher if you are fighting ill health, though there are complications to this that I will consider when I explain various diseases in future articles.

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PRAL Alkalinity Calculation for Acid-Alkaline Foods

How do you measure your food intake?

There is a simple calculation for acid and alkaline foods that can measure your pH balance diet score. However, like many things that are simple, there is more to the pH balance calculation than meets the eye.

Let’s start with some background.

PRAL Alkalinity Calculation Background

People calculate PRAL alkalinity scores to estimate their pH balance. But pH balance means different things to different people. At Foodary, I assume it to mean:
pH balance is the overall balance between acid and alkali (base) in the human body, as measured by the alkalinity of urine.

The important points are:

  • pH (powers of hydrogen) is a specific scale showing acid or alkaline properties.
  • pH Balance is a balance between acid and alkali – both are important
  • pH Balance is measurable
  • pH Balance relates to urine from the kidneys, as distinct from blood acid base balance
  • pH Balance relates to the effect of diet on the body after digestion of food and drink

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What Nutrition Data Do You Need?

In this first phase of the food diary project, I have imported some nutrition data from another health project.

Though this initial data focuses on Potential Renal Acid Load (PRAL) and calories, the food diary will contain many more nutrition values.

The food diary will initially be based on enhanced USDA data. This public domain data is widely used by many online food diaries, but it does have some drawbacks.

These easiest one to overcome is the one I have already tackled. PRAL is a calculated value, but it is not present in the original USDA nutrition tables. A simple calculation allows me to present PRAL values in a usable format, which should cater for all those people interested in acid-alkaline diets. But is this enough? Is NEAP important to you?

Are there other nutrition values that are important to you?

Read moreWhat Nutrition Data Do You Need?